Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to navigation Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

Category: mental health

Protecting Our Future: Emergency Preparedness and Children’s Mental Health

Sad boy sitting against a brick wall with his face hidden

Among the many lessons learned during the 2017 Hurricane season, we recognized that addressing children’s mental and behavioral health needs is a major concern in hurricane-affected areas. CDC’s At Risk Task Force (ARTF) was established in 2017 to ensure identification and prioritization of the mental and physical health needs of at-risk populations, including children. ARTF’s Read More >

Posted on by Jessica Franks, MPH, CHES, Health Communications Fellow, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities; Rebecca Leeb, PhD, Acting Team Lead, Children’s Preparedness Unit, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities; Amy Wolkin, DrPH, MSPH, Vulnerable Populations Officer, Center for Preparedness and Response1 CommentTags , , , , , , , ,

Using Trauma-Informed Care to Guide Emergency Preparedness and Response

Image of the destruction left behind by Hurricane Irma

Exposure to a traumatic event or set of circumstances can negatively affect a person’s mental, physical, social, emotional or spiritual well-being for a long time after the initial incident. We know that not all individuals respond to trauma in the same way and we know that individuals with a history of trauma, especially childhood trauma, Read More >

Posted on by Amy Wolkin, DrPH, Vulnerable Population Officer, Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response, CDC; and Anita Everett, MD, Chief Medical Officer, SAMSHA4 CommentsTags , , , ,

After the Storm: Helping Kids Cope

A boy and his mother wait to cross the street on their way to school.

Changing schools is hard for any kid. Imagine picking up without any notice and moving to a new school in a brand new place with a different climate, culture, and maybe even a different primary language.  Harder still is the thought of moving because your home and community have been devastated by a major hurricane. Read More >

Posted on by Caitlyn Lutfy, Health Communication Specialist, Emergency Risk Communications Branch1 CommentTags , , , , , , ,

Preparing for College Life: A Healthy Guide

student studying outdoors.

Zoey Brown joined the Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response during this past summer to help with a data analysis project. She saw a number of CDC programs and activities, and authored the following post to the Public Health Matters blog. The views expressed are her own, and do not necessarily represent those of Read More >

Posted on by Zoey Brown, David J. Sencer CDC Museum Intern, The Walker School7 CommentsTags , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Step it up outdoors

Mother and father swinging daughter outdoors

Physical activity can improve your health. People who are physically active tend to live longer and have lower risk for heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes, depression, and some cancers. Physical activity can also help with weight control, and may improve academic achievement in students. Walking is an easy way to start and maintain a Read More >

Posted on by Brittany Curtis, Health Communications Specialist, Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity6 CommentsTags , , , , , , , ,

How We Can Help Children In Rural Communities Thrive

Children Having Fun And Balancing On Tree In Fall Woodland

When children grow up in a safe and nurturing home environment, have opportunities to learn, and time to interact and build relationships with other children, they are more likely to reach their full potential. This is especially true for children with mental, behavioral, and developmental disorders. Mental, behavioral, and developmental disorders, such as anxiety, attention-deficit/hyperactivity Read More >

Posted on by Blog Administrator1 CommentTags , , , ,
TOP