NIOSH Science Blog Posts

The Effectiveness of DIY Air Filtration Units

  Portable air filtration units, or air cleaners, remove airborne particles (called aerosols) from the air indoors. Air filtration units were widely used during large wildfire outbreaks in the western United States,[1] and their use surged nationwide during the COVID-19 pandemic as a way to reduce exposure to aerosols containing the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Homemade or Read More >

Posted on by Raymond Derk, MS; Jayme Coyle, PhD; William Lindsley, PhD; Francoise Blachere, MSc; Angela Lemons, MS; Samantha Service, MS; Stephen Martin Jr., PhD, PE; Kenneth Mead, PhD, PE; Steven Fotta; Jeffrey Reynolds, PhD, PE; Walter McKinney, MSEE; Erik Sinsel, MS; Donald Beezhold, PhD; and John Noti, PhDLeave a comment

Oil and Gas Workers Count

  Energy has been in the news lately. Amid the discussions about energy prices and climate change, there has been far less media attention on the people who do hazardous work extracting the oil and gas so many of us use to stay warm and get where we need to go. These workers and the Read More >

Posted on by Ken Scott, PhD, MPH, and Tim Bushnell, PhD, MPA3 Comments

Most-viewed NIOSH Products of 2022

  As we look forward to 2023, we also are taking a look back at our most-viewed products of 2022. After two years of information focused on COVID-19, 2022 brought a variety of topics that engaged our users including ergonomics, construction, ladder safety, and working in the heat. Below is a summary of the top Read More >

Posted on by Garrett Burnett, MS, MBA; Katie Shahan, JD; Burt Tienken; and Julie Tisdale-Pardi, MA1 Comment

Safety Intervention Grant Programs Can Be Effective in Preventing Workplace Injuries

  Workers’ compensation (WC) insurers and other organizations offer grant programs to fund employers to install equipment and other engineering changes to improve workplace safety. Research provides some evidence that these types of programs can be effective in preventing workplace injuries. As a key example, the Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation (OHBWC) since 1999 has Read More >

Posted on by Steven J. Wurzelbacher, PhD; Stephen J. Bertke, PhD; Michael P. Lampl, MS; P. Timothy Bushnell, PhD, MPA; Alysha R. Meyers, PhD; Brian D. Lowe, PhD, David C. Robins, AAS; Steven J. Naber, PhD; Marie Hayden, MS; and Libby L. Moore, PhDLeave a comment

Law Enforcement Appreciation Day

  January 9, 2023 is National Law Enforcement Appreciation Day. Law enforcement officers (LEO) place their lives and their health and safety at risk while protecting the public. While some of the risks may be obvious, there are many hazards officers face in the line of duty including: motor vehicle incidents, needlestick injuries, noise and Read More >

Posted on by Hope M. Tiesman, PhD; Melanie Lee Fowler, MS, CSP; Luenda Charles, PhD, MPH; John M. Violanti, PhD; Desta Fekedulegn PhD, MPH; Christa L. Themann, MA, CCC-A; Sarah Hughes, MPH.Leave a comment

Researching Risk of Birth Defects Among Children of Male Firefighters

  Over 1.1 million firefighters protect our communities and environment in the United States.1 Firefighters face hazardous conditions and chemicals while on the job, which may have safety and health implications. The National Fallen Firefighters Foundation named reproductive health as a priority research topic in 2021. But so far very few studies have evaluated birth Read More >

Posted on by Amel Omari, PhD, MPH; Miriam R. Siegel, DrPH, MPH; and Carissa M Rocheleau, PhD1 Comment

Staying Safe Up on the Rooftop and in Extreme Temperatures

As Santa prepares to head out for the big night, we have a few last-minute bits of advice to keep him safe in the elements and while working at heights. Fall Prevention With the amount of time Santa spends “up on the rooftop” a review of the NIOSH falls prevention materials is an essential item Read More >

Posted on by Julie Tisdale-Pardi, MA, and Katie Shahan, JDLeave a comment

Evaluation of the Characteristics of Workers Injured on the Job Requiring Hospitalization and Employer Compliance with OSHA’s Reporting Requirement for these Work-Related Hospitalizations

  Surveillance data is essential to identify and target prevention for all public health activity. Accurate and timely surveillance data are needed to identify causes of injury and illnesses, monitor prevention activity, plan interventions and evaluate the efficacy of these interventions. Unlike general public health surveillance, employers are a potential source of work-related injuries and Read More >

Posted on by Kenneth D. Rosenman, MD; Mary Jo Reilly, MS; and Ling Wang, PhDLeave a comment

The Availability and Validity of Information on Children Exposed to the 9/11/2001 Disaster

  In 2002, the World Trade Center Health Registry (WTCHR) was established in New York City’s Department of Health and Mental Hygiene to monitor the health of people directly exposed to the 9/11 attacks in NYC. The WTCHR monitors the short and long-term (20+ years) physical and mental health conditions caused by the terrorist attacks Read More >

Posted on by Robert M. Brackbill, PhD, MPH; Emma Butturini, MPH; James E. Cone, MD, MPH; Robert D. Daniels, PhD, CHP; Mark R. Farfel, ScD; Paul Gambino; and Travis Kubale, PhD2 Comments

And to All a Safe Flight: Transportation Safety Tips for Santa

As we continue our work at the North Pole, we are ready to help Santa take flight! Flying around the world in one night is a difficult task, but Santa is up to the challenge. With a few tips from our researchers, we guarantee it will be a safe and successful night! Being out all Read More >

Posted on by Julie Tisdale-Pardi, MA, and Katie Shahan, JD1 Comment

Ergonomics Tips for the North Pole

This holiday season we are checking in at the North Pole throughout December with some workplace safety and health advice for Santa and the elves to ensure they stay safe. In preparation for the big day, we are providing some tips to keep Santa and the elves safe while making, lifting, loading, and delivering all Read More >

Posted on by Julie Tisdale-Pardi, MA, and Katie Shahan, JD6 Comments

Workplace Supported Recovery: New NIOSH Research Addresses an Evolving Crisis

Introduction The nation continues to struggle with a complex, ever-changing substance use landscape and an increase in related overdose deaths. Substance use disorders (SUDs) represent an important public and occupational health issue that is costly for society and limits an individual’s success and opportunities in many important areas of life (e.g., family, friendships, employment).1,2 The Read More >

Posted on by Michael R. Frone, PhD; Jamie C. Osborne, MPH, CHES®; L. Casey Chosewood, MD, MPH; and John Howard, MDLeave a comment

Driving Safety Tips to Keep Your Employees Safe this Holiday Season

  ‘Tis the holiday season—the busiest time of year for workers in the retail and delivery industries. Sadly, more fatal crashes happen during the holidays because more people travel, drink more alcohol, and drive at unsafe speeds. [1] Due to the seasonal rise in online shopping, many employers will hire temporary drivers for the holiday Read More >

Posted on by Debbie Hornback, William K. Sieber, Eric Carbone, Rebecca Knuth, and Srinivas KondaLeave a comment

Protecting Temporary Workers: Best Practices for Host Employers

  Hiring temporary workers can be a way for businesses to meet fluctuating labor demands. But, keeping temporary workers safe on the job presents unique challenges, in part due to their dual employment arrangement in which they are paid by a staffing company and assigned to work for a host employer company. According to the Read More >

Posted on by Lauren Menger-Ogle, Michael Foley, Diana Ceballos, Thomas Cunningham, Rebecca GuerinLeave a comment

Promoting Partnerships to Explore the Impacts of Technological Change on Work and Well-being

Technology has a longstanding record of impacting work, the workplace, and the workforce. Automation, or finding new ways for tasks to be completed by machines and computers, has been a common industry practice since the 1970s [1]. Historically, the increased automation of routine tasks also increased demand for highly trained and educated people to focus Read More >

Posted on by Sarah A Felknor, MS, DrPH; Jessica MK Streit, MS, PhD, CHES®; and Nicole T Edwards, MSLeave a comment

Worker Well-being Takes Center Stage: Fireside Chat with the U.S. Surgeon General

U.S. Surgeon General, Vice Admiral Vivek H. Murthy, MD, MBA, participated in a fireside chat on the final day of the 3rd International Symposium to Advance Total Worker Health®. Dr. Murthy joined Dr. L. Casey Chosewood, Director of the NIOSH Total Worker Health (TWH) Program, for a conversation about protecting and promoting worker safety, health, Read More >

Posted on by Emily Kirby, BPH, and L. Casey Chosewood, MD, MPH2 Comments

The Risk of COPD is Increased for Workers in Certain Industries and Occupations and with Certain Occupational Exposures

  November is National COPD Prevention Month.  COPD – chronic obstructive pulmonary disease – is characterized by airflow obstruction and breathing-related problems. The term COPD includes the conditions of emphysema and chronic bronchitis.  COPD is a major cause of illness in the United States.  It affects at least 15 million US adult men and women Read More >

Posted on by Paul K. Henneberger, MPH, ScD2 Comments

NIOSH Rising Stars

Like many workplaces, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) is working to help prepare staff to become leaders in their fields. One way NIOSH is readying its next generation of leaders is through the Rising Stars Program. The Rising Stars program was created by NIOSH to provide an opportunity for employees to Read More >

Posted on by Amanda Dunnick, MPH; Margaret Banton, MSA, SPHR, SHRM-SCP; and Constance Franklin, MPALeave a comment

Construction Helmets and Work-related Traumatic Brain Injury

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a disruption in the normal function of the brain that can be caused by a bump, blow, or jolt to the head, or penetrating head injury. TBIs are a global public health problem and is a leading cause of injury-related death and disability [1]. While TBIs can be mild, some Read More >

Posted on by Douglas Trout, MD, MHS; G. Scott Earnest, PhD, PE, CSP; Christopher Pan, PhD, CPE; and John Z. Wu, PhD7 Comments

Total Worker Health® Symposium: A Closer Look at Keynotes

We’re taking a closer look at the presentations delivered during the 3rd International Symposium to Advance Total Worker Health®. Attendees from across the globe heard from experts in the field during keynote addresses, presentations, workshops, and “bright spots,” a new conference feature that highlights successful and innovative interventions in 10-minute presentations. Presentations explored opportunities to Read More >

Posted on by Emily Kirby, BPH1 Comment