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Category: Lynch Syndrome

Can an Aspirin a Day Prevent Colorectal Cancer in People with Lynch Syndrome?

a hand holding a pill with several other pills on the table and a pill bottle and a body with an exposed colon

Encouraging news for group at much greater risk of CRC Lynch syndrome (LS) is the most common cause of hereditary colorectal (colon) cancer (CRC). People with LS have a 50-70% risk of developing CRC in their lifetimes – far higher than the 4% risk within the general population where CRC is a leading cause of Read More >

Posted on by Scott Bowen, Office of Public Health Genomics; Nicole Dowling, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion; and Muin J. Khoury, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GeorgiaLeave a commentTags

Universal Screening for Lynch Syndrome: Can Tumor Sequencing Have a Larger Public Health Impact on Treatment and Prevention of Colorectal Cancer?

Universal Screening with an arrow labeled Lynch Syndrome and DNA below it

Lynch syndrome (LS) is the most common hereditary syndrome associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), accounting for about 3% of CRC patients. LS is a dominantly inherited condition with mutations in several mismatch repair (MMR) genes. Persons with LS are also at increased risk for endometrial and other cancers. Lynch syndrome affects 1 Read More >

Posted on by Muin J. Khoury, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, and Heather Hampel, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ohio State University, Columbus, OhioLeave a commentTags , ,

Recommendations and Reality: What Personal Stories of Hereditary Cancer Can Tell Us

four photos of Sarah, Dave, Zac and Gloria (reading order starting top left)

In public health and clinical medicine, recommendations for interventions are generally based on the evidence supporting improved health outcomes. Studies that inform these recommendations often focus on the evidence for benefits, especially when those benefits include lives saved. The harms that affect quality of life are more challenging to quantify and sometimes go unmeasured. Recommendations Read More >

Posted on by Ridgely Fisk Green, Carter Consulting, Inc., and Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Katrina Trivers, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention1 CommentTags ,

A Public Health Genomic State-by-State Clickable Map: Accelerating Implementation of Genomics Applications to Improve Population Health

US Map

In recent years, public health programs in several states have used innovative approaches to implement evidence-based genomic testing recommendations in an effort to improve health outcomes for people at increased hereditary risk for breast, ovarian, colorectal and other cancers.  For example, the Michigan Department of Community Health [PDF 1.04 MB] has partnered with payers in Read More >

Posted on by Karen Greendale, MA, CGC, McKing Consulting, Contractor for the Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention1 CommentTags , , , , , , ,

Making Universal Screening for Lynch Syndrome a Reality: The Lynch Syndrome Screening Network

flow chart individual

Every day, about 400 people in the United States are diagnosed with colorectal cancer. Approximately twelve of them have Lynch syndrome, a hereditary condition that increases the risk of colorectal cancer and other cancers.  Identifying people with Lynch syndrome could have substantial health benefits for them, their families, and communities.   Read More >

Posted on by Deb Duquette, MS, CGC & Sarah Mange, MPH- Michigan Department of Community Health; Cecelia Bellcross, PhD, MS- Emory University; Heather Hampel, MS, CGC- The Ohio State University; Kory Jasperson, MS, CGC- Huntsman Cancer Institute (Authors are all from the Lynch Syndrome Screening Network (LSSN) Founding Board of Directors)1 CommentTags , , , , ,
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