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Genomics and Precision Health Posts

What’s the “value” of exome sequencing in children with neurodevelopmental disorders?

children in a classroom setting

This is a summary of a recent commentary in Genetics in Medicine by Grosse and Rasmussen. Exome sequencing (ES) is increasingly used as part of the genetics evaluation of neurodevelopmental disorders, and acute illness in newborns of suspected genetic origin, among others. However, barriers to the clinical use of ES include a widespread reluctance of insurers Read More >

Posted on by Muin J. Khoury, Office of Genomics and Precision Public Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GeorgiaLeave a commentTags , ,

Can a Healthy Lifestyle Reduce Your Risk of Dementia Regardless of Your Genes? – Part II

three set of figures depicting dementia

A new, long term cohort study suggests that healthy lifestyle is associated with a lower risk for dementia among people considered at lower and intermediate genetic risk but not for those considered at high genetic risk. “Globally, about 47 million people were living with dementia in 2015, and this number is projected to triple by Read More >

Posted on by Scott Bowen, Office of Public Health Genomics; Christopher Taylor, Division of Population Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion; and Muin J. Khoury, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GeorgiaLeave a commentTags ,

Can an Aspirin a Day Prevent Colorectal Cancer in People with Lynch Syndrome?

a hand holding a pill with several other pills on the table and a pill bottle and a body with an exposed colon

Encouraging news for group at much greater risk of CRC Lynch syndrome (LS) is the most common cause of hereditary colorectal (colon) cancer (CRC). People with LS have a 50-70% risk of developing CRC in their lifetimes – far higher than the 4% risk within the general population where CRC is a leading cause of Read More >

Posted on by Scott Bowen, Office of Public Health Genomics; Nicole Dowling, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion; and Muin J. Khoury, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GeorgiaLeave a commentTags

Introducing the CDC Office of Genomics and Precision Public Health: What’s in a Name?

Public Health Genomics changing to Genomics & Precision Public Health with a checkmark and DNA

Starting this week, the CDC Office of Public Health Genomics will be renamed the CDC Office of Genomics and Precision Public Health. In many ways, this transition has been a few years in the making and reflects the continuous broadening of our scope from human genomics and public health to include other areas relevant to Read More >

Posted on by Muin J. Khoury, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GeorgiaLeave a comment

Data Science and Machine Learning in Public Health: Promises and Challenges

a man holding two circles - one with a bar chart and one with a tablet with data coming out

In August 2019, two of us (CJP, DR) visited the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and gave a seminar on the promises and challenges of using “big data” for “precision public health” using the tools of “data science”. The seminar was well attended, with more than 200 participants. The audience was engaged, asking great Read More >

Posted on by Chirag J Patel and Danielle Rasooly, Department of Biomedical Informatics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, and Muin J. Khoury, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GeorgiaLeave a commentTags ,

Genetic Counseling and Public Health in the Era of Precision Medicine

In August 2019, the All of Us Research Program announced the funding of a nationwide resource to provide genetic counseling support to one or more million participants in the precision medicine cohort in the United States. Participants from diverse populations will share health information over time through surveys and electronic health records, and they will Read More >

Posted on by Muin J. Khoury, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia1 CommentTags , ,

Implementation science and genomic medicine in action: A case study

lab workers and DNA

There is an urgent need for researchers and implementers of genomic medicine to incorporate implementation science into their translational research efforts. Implementation science is the study of methods to promote the adoption and integration of evidence-based practices, interventions, and policies into routine healthcare and public health settings to improve our impact on population health. But Read More >

Posted on by Mindy Clyne, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, Maryland, and Muin J. Khoury, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GeorgiaLeave a commentTags ,

Precision Medicine Update: Important Progress on the Long Road from Discovery to Population Health Impact

a long road with DNA and the text Discovery and Population Health Impact

Impressive Pace and Potential The All of Us Research Program is an ambitious United States initiative launched in 2015 to collect health-related information on one million or more volunteers from diverse communities. A recent paper in the New England Journal of Medicine described progress and lays out the vision for the initiative moving forward. As Read More >

Posted on by Muin J. Khoury, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta Georgia and George A. Mensah, Center for Translation Research and Implementation Science, National Heart, Lung, and Blood InstituteLeave a commentTags

Can a Healthy Lifestyle Reduce Your Risk of Dementia Regardless of Your Genes?

a hand writing Dementia with bar bells and an apple wrapped in a measuring tape and DNA

A large retrospective, cohort study found that a healthy lifestyle is associated with a lower risk for dementia among people considered at high genetic risk. An active lifestyle, which includes a nutritious diet, limited alcohol, and not smoking, has long been associated with reduced risk of cancer and heart disease. In the last ten years, Read More >

Posted on by Scott Bowen, Office of Public Health Genomics; Christopher Taylor, Division of Population Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion; and Muin J. Khoury, Office of Public Health Genomics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GeorgiaLeave a commentTags ,

Why should early career public health researchers pay attention to precision medicine?

one main figure connect to three others

In a recent commentary published in the American Journal of Public Health, I had the privilege of working with a group of early career investigators to begin a conversation about the impact that the debate between the utility of precision medicine and public health approaches is having as we begin our research careers. To begin, let’s Read More >

Posted on by Caitlin G. Allen, MPH, Doctoral Student, Behavioral Sciences and Health Education Department, Emory University Rollins School of Public Health, Atlanta, GeorgiaLeave a commentTags
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